1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

My favourite Zen story December 18, 2009

Zen is one of the few spiritual practices that teaches thoughtless awareness. Nevertheless, it is often hard for me to comprehend. Probably because the approach – how to come to thoughtless awareness – is still mental (the way I come to it is more physical).
 
Zen stories are popular and I like some of them a lot. Here is the winner of  my personal Oscar. In a simple yet outstanding way it describes how our brain works.
  
Two traveling monks reached a river where they met a young woman.

Wary of the current, she asked if they could carry her across.

One of the monks hesitated, but the other quickly picked her up onto his shoulders,

transported her across the water, and put her down on the other bank. She thanked him and departed.

As the monks continued on their way, the one was brooding and preoccupied.

Unable to hold his silence, he spoke out. (more…)

 

The purpose of the Japanese Gardens July 12, 2008

 image by snutur

In Japan we had a great master whose name was Vidhitama. He was the disciple of Lord Buddah and he went to Japan and started the Zen system. Zen means meditation-dhyana – and he wanted people to become “thoughtlessly aware”. He found out many ways of making people “thoughtlessly aware” – the tea ceremony and the temples that they have, are all meant to create thoughtless awareness.

I was amazed that none of the Japanese knew what the purpose of these gardens were. There is one garden which has some moss on top of a hill in a very small area and it is very interesting. You have to see the flowers and other foliage there through a magnifying glass. And this should amaze a person and one should become thoughtlessly aware.

Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi, META MODERN ERA

 

 
%d bloggers like this: