1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

Order a good book in a different manner! March 29, 2009

A friend of mine has written a book and now introduces it in an unconventional manner: print-on-demand!

The book “The Wisdom Tradition” by John Noyce is an insight into philosophical and religious thought of the West from a bit different perspective –descriptions of Divine (or Eternal) Feminine that have been found in a wide range of written accounts including materials not traditionally regarded as ‘religious’, such as philosophy, literature, and those areas of study – alchemy, astrology, theosophy, and various magical traditions – known as Western Esotericism.

Here is the preview by the author:

Chapter 1: Sophia and feminine Wisdom
The first chapter presents an overview of feminine Wisdom from Proverbs in the eighth-century BCE through to Suso and his contemporaries in the 14/15th centuries CE, with particular emphasis on the divine manifestations as received in visions and dreams, and recorded in a variety of written forms. Throughout this period of time much of the surviving literature presents Divinity in masculine terms as an omnipotent God, able to assert His authority over nature. In the Wisdom tradition however, Wisdom is presented in feminine terms, working with nature. It can be argued therefore that the descriptions of feminine Wisdom encountered in this time period, and particularly in the medieval period, can be seen as providing alternative forms for the (safe) expression of the matriarchal view of the Divine inside the increasingly rigid and authoritarian patriarchy of the Christian Church.

 (painting the Mother of the World by Nicolai Rerich 1874-1947)

Chapter 2: From Boehme to Goethe: visions of Sophia in early modern Europe
This chapter is a survey of Sophianic theosophism from its beginnings in the writings of Jakob Boehme in the early seventeenth century. Included here are the English mystics, John Pordage and Jane Lead, the German theosophists, Johann Georg Gichtel and Gottfried Arnold, and their influence on the German Romantic writers, Novalis, Holderlin and Goethe at the turn of the nineteenth century.

Chapter 3: Sophia and the Russian mystical tradition
Awareness of Wisdom (Sophia) is not unique to the Western tradition. Relatively little attention has been given to the origins of the Russian understanding of Sophia. In this chapter I propose that there were in fact two sources: namely the understanding of Sophia as divine Wisdom in Byzantium, and the later introduction to Russia of the Boehmian theosophical understanding of Sophia. (more…)

 

The spring is finally there! March 28, 2009

 

Sound the flute!
Now it’s mute!
Bird’s delight,
Day and night,
Nightingale,
In the dale,
Lark in sky,
Merrily,
Merrily merrily, to welcome in the year.

Full of joy;
Little girl,
Sweet and small;
Cock does crow,
So do you;
Merry voice,
Infant noise;
Merrily, merrily, to welcome in the year.

Little lamb,
Here I am;
Come and lick
My white neck;
Let me pull
Your soft wool;
Let me kiss
Your soft face;
Merrily, merrily, to welcome in the year.

poem by William Blake

(image by me)

 

The answer March 9, 2009

(image by me)

To see a World in a Grain of Sand,

And heaven in a Wild flower,

Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand

And Eternity in an hour.

poem by William Blake

 

Love and Harmony February 17, 2009

Filed under: innocence,joy,love,poem,poetry,spirituality,thoughts — axinia @ 10:48 pm
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Love and harmony combine,
And round our souls entwine
While thy branches mix with mine,
And our roots together join.

Joys upon our branches sit,
Chirping loud and singing sweet;
Like gentle streams beneath our feet
Innocence and virtue meet.

Thou the golden fruit dost bear,
I am clad in flowers fair;
Thy sweet boughs perfume the air,
And the turtle buildeth there.

There she sits and feeds her young,
Sweet I hear her mournful song;
And thy lovely leaves among,
There is love, I hear his tongue.

There his charming nest doth lay,
There he sleeps the night away;
There he sports along the day,
And doth among our branches play.

William Blake
(1757 – 1827)

 

 

What Jerusalem did William Blake mean with his poem? August 20, 2008

There is an exceptionally beautiful poem by William Blake JERUSALEM (1804). They say, the poem was inspired by the apocryphal story that a young Jesus, travelled to England and visited Glastonbury. This legend is linked to an idea in the Book of Revelation ( 3:12 and 21:2) describing a Second Coming wherein Jesus establishes a new Jerusalem. What kind of new Jerusalem? And why in England?

However as usual, with the saintly people and poets one never know the true meaning of the message ( a post on the fascinating story on Michelangelo`s paintings follows!)… I feel that there is so much behind this Blake`s poem  – much more that the regular critisc explain here. 

One of my first posts in this blog was actually on William Blake, for I consider him to be the gratest Western spiritual poet. His panings, prints and poems emit amazing vibrations, and I was lucky enough to touch the originals – post here.

And now- enjoy the Jerusalem by Blake (song):

The poem itself: (more…)

 

 
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