1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

How I gave birth to an “Indian” child or The fascinating pregnancy experinces March 29, 2011

the baby in my belly

The state of pregnancy has been considered sacred in all cultures around the world. After having experienced it myself I can definitely call it a mystical, truly spiritual experience.

It’s commonly known that pregnant ladies may have sudden gusto for certain foods, but believe me, there is much more behind! I went through a clear transformation of my character, preferences and interests. I was watching myself carefully and detached  and made this notes for you. 
 
1.Food.
I had no sudden desires for this or that, nothing what is considered typical for a pregnant lady. Just the opposite: shortly after I became pregnant I had to become…a vegetarian! That was quite a surprise, because I did not think of vegetarianism as of a healthy diet, at least not for our climate. In fact I used to be vegetarian at 19, but this diet badly damaged my health (my hemoglobin parameters went much down) and I decided rather to eat meat in order to keep fit.
Well, it turned out that the baby did not like meat, any kind of it! No chicken, no fish. Sometimes eggs and caviar. I really tried hard but could not swallow even a piece!  That was truly the most unexpected experience, because it was so clear that I was not “alone” any more, that someone inside my body could dictate some other wishes.
 
2. Music and art
I have always been fond of Indian culture. However after getting pregnant I could ONLY listen to Indian classical music (ragas) and nothing else. Although before I loved to listen to Mozart almost every day. In my pregnancy even Mozart was too much, needless to say that other Western composers or bands sounded totally wrong for me at that time.
Another “Indian” thing was that I all of a sudden got interested in Indian temple and palace architecture: I had a book on it that I bought once in India but never read it. In my pregnancy I would open this book and admire the pictures for hours together…I aslo wanted to see historical Indian films and touch Indian materials and ornaments… That felt very special.
 
3.The baby’s name.
Since my husband and I are of a Slavic origin, we honestly were looking through all possible Slavic names in order to find one that would fit well the family name. But something felt wrong. One day we went through an Indian acient script of Lalita Sahasranama and stumbled upon a lovely melodious name “Malini” (stress on the first syllable) with a wonderful meaning “decorated with the garland of graciousness”. That felt like a perfect choice!
 
4.My character
Another manifestation of “somebody else’s presence” in my body was that my preferences in socialization changed. Being a communicative, active person by nature, I started avoiding communication, meetings and parties as much as possible. That did not look like me at all! People were wondering. Then, being a balanced, peaceful person by nature I became even more balanced and peaceful. And I felt that this was the nature of the child-to-be-born. (more…)
 

Do you believe in Rebirth? September 27, 2008

 author unknown

I got this smart picture sent from India – that is an excellent piece of humour 🙂 I enjoyed the picture so much that I felt inspired to write a post on this truly mysterious topic.

Reincarnation, literally “to be made flesh again”, is a metaphysical belief that some essential part of a living being (in some variations only human beings) survives death to be reborn in a new body. This essential part is often referred to as the spirit or soul, the “higher” or “true” self, “divine spark”, or “I”. According to such beliefs, a new personality is developed during each life in the physical world, but some part of the self remains constant throughout the successive lives.

Belief in reincarnation is an ancient phenomenon. This doctrine is a central tenet within the majority of Indian religious traditions, such as Hinduism (including Yoga, Vaishnavism, and Shaivism), Jainism, and Sikhism. The idea was also entertained by some ancient Greek philosophers. Many modern Pagans also believe in reincarnation as do some New Age movements, along with followers of Spiritism, practitioners of certain African traditions, and students of esoteric philosophies such as Kabbalah, Sufism and Gnostic and Esoteric Christianity. The Buddhist concept of Rebirth although often referred to as reincarnation differs significantly from the Hindu-based traditions and New Age movements in that there is no “self” (or eternal soul) to reincarnate.

Rebirth or reincarnation has become a popular topic since last decades in the West. (more…)

 

 
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