1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

My military childhood December 7, 2008

I found this old picture of my class and suddenly felt like writing a very personal post, which may somewhat a different perspective on me…

Due to my fathers profession – he was a Soviet Army officer – I grew up in a rather unusual conditions compared to the rest: in a kind of a military ghetto.

We used to live in small “military” towns in Soviet Union and abroad  -surrounded by a wall. The only men I saw around were officers and soldiers. By now I hold my breath when I see a man in a uniform 🙂

It was a blissful time because we have been so incredibly protected, that we never ever heard of crimes, violence, any danger – we felt perfectly safe and secure. At the same time our fathers went to the war in Afghanistan – but we were too small to realise the horror of it.

We were all friends, the international military citizens from all over the Soviet Union (dozens of nations), we lived like a big family. What was really special is the feeling of unity, trust, honor and respect. And we were proud of our fathers. (more…)

 

How to save the word…with non-action. July 30, 2008

Many people dream of saving the world. Combatting terrorism, global warming, mafia, corruption, etc… And there is another possibility of doing it – to be exact, NOT to do a certain thing. Not to commit the fatal mistake. There are some stories from the time of the Cold War when the world has been saved through the non-action of military people.

This is an amazing true story about the man, who held the future of the world in his hands for 10 min. In 1983. 

A Russian pensioner in a village north of Moscow claims he saved the world. Most people would walk straight on if accosted in the street with that tale. But the truth is that Stanislav Petrov, interviewed on Monday for a Radio 4 programme and about whom a film is being made, did exactly that.

 image by James Gordon

On September 26 1983, Petrov, a 44-year-old lieutenant colonel, was monitoring the Soviet Union’s early warning satellites from a command bunker. Three weeks earlier a Korean jetliner, with 269 passengers on board, had been shot down over Soviet airspace. The Americans were about to deploy the Pershing II missile that could hit Moscow from West Germany in 12 minutes. Ronald Reagan had called the Soviet Union an “evil empire” and launched his “star wars” programme. The Soviet leader Yuri Andropov, critically ill with renal failure, thought Reagan already had a missile defence system and was convinced that the US was about to shoot first. (more…)

 

 
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