1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

The Divine Feminine in Islam June 16, 2012

Filed under: thoughts — axinia @ 11:06 pm
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BURAQ

The fanaticism that we see in modern Islam is a new development in a religion that, in its early history, was famous for its tolerance and respect for other religions. In Islam’s classical period in medieval Spain and Egypt perhaps only Buddhism rivalled Islam’s tolerance. The fundamentalism that characterises the behaviour of many of today’s Muslims is in fact anti-Koranic.

While the Muslim vision is often perceived to be authoritarian and punitive the Koran, on close inspection, is filled with descriptions and vision of God’s more feminine attributes such as gentleness, providence, love, universal compassion and tender-heartedness.

The religious intolerance that characterises the behaviour of many Muslim communities today is inconsistent with the heritage of tolerance that is professed by the Islamic tradition. For example, the Koran clearly states in several passages that any person who lives a life of holy reverence is welcomed into paradise regardless of their religion. Muhammad openly praises both Judaism (Abraham is deeply respected within the Koran) and Christianity (Muhammad frequently praises Jesus and Mary in the Koran).

Even more surprising is the Koran’s reverence for Mary, mother of Christ. Muhammad (and also in later Islamic theological scriptures) regarded Mary as the most marvellous of all women, a high adept and living example of the pure and holy life. Later Koranic commentaries describe Mary as an intervening force between God (Allah) and humanity. This intervening force is characterised by Allah’s mercy, forgiveness, sweetness and humility- the embodiment of Allah’s love for creation.

In one of the most powerful Hadiths ( prophetic sayings of Muhammad) it is reported that Muhammad said, “Paradise is at the feet of the Mother”. Does this suggest that the feminine aspect of God is an important and essential pathway to the attainment of supreme consciousness?

Muhammad’s peak defining experience, called the Meraj, saw him elevated through the seven heavens to the realm of God Almighty at the resplendant Sidrath where he communed with God, received his divine visions and instructions and was placed on the inexorable course of his life-mission to establish Islam. Muhammad was escorted by the archangel Gabriel (a masculine force) but the vehicle upon which Muhammad rode was the beautiful “Buraq”. The Buraq was a white horse with wings and the face of a woman! Clearly suggesting that the great power by which Muhammad was elevated to the level of supreme consciousness was ultimately feminine in nature! Some scholars say that the Buraq is an Islamic symbol of the Kundalini, a force that Eastern Yogis describe as the Goddess or Divine Mother. (more…)

 

Why conditionings are more respected than a free will? May 11, 2009

 (image by me)

There is one interesting feature in a human character that amazes me the most. I don’t know the exact source of this phenomenon but its nature puzzles me every time I face it.

I have always been able to withstand some wide-spread conditioning/habits if I would consider them wrong. Such as, at my teens I was the first in my school to rebel against the school uniform and started wearing regular cloths. In my adult life I have opposed successfully and constructive some collective madness… What strikes me most about these experiencs, it is the fact that people, when it comes to some common shared views (which is oft nothing but superstition or conditioning) are not able to respect a FREE WILL, but they would except it if you justify something with another conditioning.

My favorite example in this case is alcohol drinking. I don’t drink alcohol since many years because somehow I dislike the taste of it. Apart from that I don’t need the effect of it – I think the main reason why people drink it is because they say their brain relaxes and they get into the better mood. Both is not needed in my case as my brain is never under pressure and I am always in the joyful mood. Anyway, whenever I am at a party or with people usually drink, they all try to insist on my drinking (Calssical arguments like “come on, you are Russian, you have to”, or “don’t you respect us?” etc.). (more…)

 

The Manganiyar show in Vienna – amazing performance (slide) July 10, 2008

Last night I have seen one of the most amazing and beautiful performances in my life – traditional Indian music in front of the thousands in the artistic Center of Vienna, Austria. I just did not expect such an interest to this kind of music, which really needs some “adjustment” for the Western listener…

Indian play director Roysten Abel has brought 43 Manganiyars (caste of musicians who traditionally performed for the kings of Rajastan in India) to Europe – that was not easy, he said -to get visas for 43 Muslims with the name Khan 🙂

The Manganiyar sing ballads about the kings and also Sufi poems written by the mystics.  Even though they are classified as folk musicians their traditional music is classical and it clearly indicates the roots of classical music in India. However the rawness of the folk and the complexness of classical music is what makes their music so special. They live in the deserts of Rajasthan and their style of singing is very similar to that of the Spanish Flamenco singers.

The performance was built up like a magic box:  43 musicians were seated in 36 red-curtained cubicles arranged in four horizontal rows one on top of the other; and the concert began when a single cubicle lit up and the first singer began his song. Soon another cubicle lit up and then another thus creating a dramatic and astounding build-up of musical instruments and voice as young men, children and the elderly of the Manganiyar community took the public into a world which is beyond… Actually it looked like the magic opening of the advent-calender .)

(more…)

 

 
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