1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

Music in relatioships October 24, 2013

Filed under: thoughts — axinia @ 2:05 pm
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image by axinia

The seer, the deep thinker, the knower of human nature, acts also as a musician by finding in people’s actions their tone and rhythm.

He notices in an untimely action, caused by ignorance or impatience, the irregularity of the rhythm; and in a word or action that has a harder or softer effect than it should have he sees the false tone, the false note. He also feels consonant or dissonant chords.

When two people meet the dissonant chord of their evolution keeps them distant from one another in thought, although they may be sitting near together; and often a third person comes who either harmonizes the dissonant chord or produces disharmony in the consonant chord.

The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan

 

The beauty of belcanto September 15, 2012

Bel canto (Bel-Canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing“) is an Italian opera term.

The earliest use of the term “bel canto” occurred in late 17th-century Italy, when it was applied to a sophisticated model of singing that was evolving there among practitioners of operatic and sacred music. In the mid-19th century, bel canto gained a more specific meaning when it was employed to distinguish what by now had developed into the traditional Italian vocal model from more forceful, less ingratiating styles of singing. These newer styles of singing had arisen as a result of 19th-century operas growing increasingly dramatic, pitting performers against louder and denser orchestral accompaniments in bigger theatres. Nonetheless, “neither musical nor general dictionaries saw fit to attempt [a] definition [of bel canto] until after 1900”. The term remains vague and ambiguous in the 21st century and is often used nostalgically to evoke a lost singing tradition.

  • Those who regard the art of singing as anything more than a means to an end, do not comprehend the true purpose of that art, much less can they hope ever to fulfil that purpose. The true purpose of singing is to give utterance to certain hidden depths in our nature which can be adequately expressed in no other way. The voice is the only vehicle perfectly adapted to this purpose; it alone can reveal to us our inmost feelings, because it is our only direct means of expression. If the voice, more than any language, more than any other instrument of expression, can reveal to us our own hidden depths, and convey those depths to other souls of men, it is because voice vibrates directly to the feeling itself, when it fulfils its natural mission. Clara Kathleen Rogers: The Philosophy Of Singing (1893)

I  am proud to post here the new slideshow with Bellini aria by my sister, Tatiana Samoylova who is a talented Belcanto singer. All images taken by me, music mixed by her talented husband.

Now see for yourself:

Aria of Elvira, I Puritani, Bellini

love,

axinia

 

Opera for everyone October 26, 2009

Have I already mentioned Vienna is the best city in the world? Apart from the official ranking results, I am deeply convinced about it myself.

Vienna is the City of Music, no doubt. The marketing works well and you will be reminded of that more often than anywhere else: in the city center you pass a duet of street singers, a small accordion band, a guitar soloist,

and finally come across about a hundred people staring up at an enormous outdoor LCD screen displaying live opera.

Since this summer Vienna has a new attraction: For the first time, selected performances are being broadcasted live on a giant screen in front of the State Opera House. Free to consume :).

Last night, while strolling around the city, I suddenly heard the sounds of my beloved Mozart from far away… OMG, was that beautiful! It felt so majestic and at the same time so natural, in a perfect harmony with the surroundings… (more…)

 

I should have everything that is good, genuine and beautiful! June 23, 2009

“I should have everything that is good, genuine and beautiful!”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Those who are familiar with Mozart life story and character will immediately recognize him in these words. He was not only a genius but something much more… The vibrations of his death place are tremendous like of a swaymbhu… Very special! Apparently they say that his horoscope at the death point was even more impressive than of the birthday. That may mean that he could not only fulfill his life mission but had given us something much more…the eternal character of the music.

I would claim that of all western classical composers Mozart is the only one whose music does not awaken emotions and does not make one think (normally the Western classical music is conceptual, full of thoughts and emotions).

I believe his music has almost the same impact as the classical Indian music – it awakens the happy spirit, washes thoughts away and makes one feel light and joyful.

But that is not all! You must have heard of “Mozart effect” :

The concept of the “Mozart effect” was described by French researcher, Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis in his 1991 book Pourquoi Mozart?. He used the music of Mozart in his efforts to “retrain” the ear, and believed that listening to the music presented at differing frequencies helped the ear, and promoted healing and the development of the brain. (more…)

 

Pushkin is Mozart October 21, 2008

 …in my perception 🙂

Seriously, when I listen to Mozart, I get the same state and same type of vibrations like when I read or recite Pushkin. Absolutely the same!

 Mozart         Pushkin

You surely know Mozart, that most popular musician ever. But who is Pushkin and why can I feel it this way?

Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin was Russian 19th century country’s greatest poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. Pushkin (1799-1837) blended Old Slavonic with vernacular Russian into a rich, melodic language. In fact, he created the language Russians speak today and defined the literary baseline for all great Russian writers, among them Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.   (more…)

 

The Manganiyar show in Vienna – amazing performance (slide) July 10, 2008

Last night I have seen one of the most amazing and beautiful performances in my life – traditional Indian music in front of the thousands in the artistic Center of Vienna, Austria. I just did not expect such an interest to this kind of music, which really needs some “adjustment” for the Western listener…

Indian play director Roysten Abel has brought 43 Manganiyars (caste of musicians who traditionally performed for the kings of Rajastan in India) to Europe – that was not easy, he said -to get visas for 43 Muslims with the name Khan 🙂

The Manganiyar sing ballads about the kings and also Sufi poems written by the mystics.  Even though they are classified as folk musicians their traditional music is classical and it clearly indicates the roots of classical music in India. However the rawness of the folk and the complexness of classical music is what makes their music so special. They live in the deserts of Rajasthan and their style of singing is very similar to that of the Spanish Flamenco singers.

The performance was built up like a magic box:  43 musicians were seated in 36 red-curtained cubicles arranged in four horizontal rows one on top of the other; and the concert began when a single cubicle lit up and the first singer began his song. Soon another cubicle lit up and then another thus creating a dramatic and astounding build-up of musical instruments and voice as young men, children and the elderly of the Manganiyar community took the public into a world which is beyond… Actually it looked like the magic opening of the advent-calender .)

(more…)

 

Can foreigners perform Indian arts better than Indians? May 30, 2008

 image credit: SY Ukraine

It is really possible? I would say no, because I also never heard anybody singing Russian songs with a greater expression than Russians themselves…

However I am not sure any more when it comes to Indian Arts, because they seem to be of a para-national character (due to their spiritual character? – I guess spirit is an international unity).

Since years I am very much interested in Indian Arts, which are incredibly beautiful and (alas!)still largely unknown in the West. I have seen many performances of Indian masters (vocal, instrumental and dance) live and on videos which gave me quite a feeling for this special art.

The other day I read in the RIAN Russian news about the Indian Dance Festival that has taken place in New Delhi this week: 6 artists from Japan, USA, France, Ukraine, South Corea and Croatia performed before Indian public their art of the Indian Classical Dance (different styles).

An artist who was interview I know personally and therefore my interest was drown to that article even more (an abstract translated by me): “Lena Lakshmi from Ukraine lives in India since 10 years and studies Indian Classical Dance  kuchipudi in Chennai, South India. Lena referrers to the traditional Indian dance as an art, which is full of awareness and spirituality, compared to the Western Classical dance. (more…)

 

 
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