1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

The capitalism is about to collaps… what’s next? July 16, 2011

image by axinia

Today many, including economists and financial experts are talking about the end of the existing financial system due to a simple mathematical law: Compound interest follows the existing monetary system an exponentially growing curve (= off 1 is 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. – as opposed to linear growth from = 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.), and unlimited growth exponentially is mathematically impossible. Any system with exponentially growing system is an ultimately self-destructive, the end is predictable. In nature, quality growth prevails: Humans, animals and plants grow quantitatively until they have reached their optimal size, then they only grow more qualitatively. Exponentially growth occurs naturally only in connection with illness and death, eg the disease like cancer behaves exponentially (from one cancer cell, 2, 4, 8, etc.). The interest from the mechanism resulted in permanent growth of the forced economy is in irresolvable conflict with the mathematical impossibility, with the known consequences of such an unbearable social imbalance and life-threatening environmental degradation.

This situation sounds hopeless (if interested to learn about truly shocking backgrounds, see Chris Martenson’s “The Crash Course Money”). Margrit Kennedy, however, offers in her book “Interest and Inflation Free Money”  1996 , a positive outlook, because it shows not only the problem but also offers a possible solution for me (as an economic layman) understandable, reasonable, sensible and feasible acts. Margrit Kennedy, was born in 1939 in Germany and has been working many years as an architect, town planner and ecologist in Germany, Nigeria, Scotland and the USA. Since her ecological projects have often been dismissed as uneconomical, she became aware that an environmental measure had to be measured with the money-creating power of money in the capital market. She began to compare the growth patterns in nature and in the monetary system and the causes of the pathological compulsion to understand economic growth, and the function of the monetary system and the dangers of an economic or ecological collapse. Margrit Kennedy assumes that very few people understand exactly how money works and how it affects their lives directly or indirectly. She holds four misunderstandings for the main obstacle to understanding the design flaw in the present monetary system: (more…)

 

Looking for alternatives: a symposium on the idea of communism March 17, 2009

(image by me)

An interesting article found in the GUARDIAN, let me quote some abstracts:

The speedy panic with which our governments agreed to throw billions of pounds away to restore “confidence” suggests that the dream is over and we are awakening to a strange new socialism, in which an increasingly authoritarian government has taken public control of financial capitalism in order to save it from itself. We read today that equal pay reviews no longer matter. Migrants are left to starve on the streets as the government heads off the far right by pandering to it. And so it’s precisely now that the question of an alternative must be re-opened.

Against this backdrop, Birkbeck College this weekend hosted a symposium on the idea of communism. Originally planned as a meeting of philosophers and those who enjoy hearing their debates, the unexpected material circumstances of history instead gave the event a genuine sense of urgency. Even the BBC came to hear Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, Jacques Ranciere, Michael Hardt, Toni Negri, and others speaking on the possibilities and challenges of reinventing the communist ideal today.

The conference was happily free of dogmatism. No one on the stage was there to represent a particular party or doctrine. There were disagreements, but at heart was a simple proposition. Communism is an idea that has been with us in different forms for thousands of years, as Terry Eagleton pointed out. The task is now to think what the concepts of egalitarian voluntarism, self-organisation, common ownership of common means of production, abolition of class-structured society, and freedom from state power can mean today.

First, the question of the role of the state and the economy remains open. While Judith Balso, Toni Negri and Alain Badiou insist on creating new political movements at a distance from the state, Zizek and Bruno Bosteels point to the experiences of Bolivia and Venezuela as contemporary proof that by taking power, a progressive radical movement can survive even against overwhelming reactionary forces.

Perhaps the true question is: why communism? (more…)

 

 
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