1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

How to make great photographs – an expert opinion and what I think of it March 25, 2009

NO, the title is not mine – I am not the one to teach others how to make great photographs. Bus as one who is interested in making good and candid photography, I find the flowing article simply outstanding.

I came across this photographer with a sharp and rather unusual view on photography – finally somebody telling me what I always felt and somehow knew… Today when photography is becoming one of the most creative and popular ways of expression oneself, people want to know the all possible tricks and gain some special technical know-how. Let’s see what a master says:

How to make great photographs

Your camera has NOTHING to do with making great photos. You have to master technique of course, but that’s just a burden to get out of the way to free yourself to tackle the really hard part. The hard part is saying something with your images.

Photography is art. It’s abstract. Therefore it’s difficult for many people to grasp. It’s easy and lazy to think a camera makes the photos. It’s easy to blame bad photos on a camera. When you get better you’ll realize you would have been better off to pay more attention to your images and less to your camera.

PATIENCE

You can’t be on a schedule. You have to go out, look around and wait for the light and inspiration.

Many great shots are made only after years of observing a subject, learning when it looks best, and returning to photograph it at its most spectacular. This is how real photographers make anything look extraordinary.

If you’re traveling with non-photographers you’re going to have to get your schedules straight, since you’ll be out shooting while normal people are eating dinner or still sleeping in the morning.

Brilliance doesn’t work on a schedule.

KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN

“Compositon is the strongest way of seeing.” Edward Weston.

You see more if you’re looking. The more you look, the more you see worth photographing. If you’re  not looking you’ll walk right past some of the most extraordinary opportunities. (more…)

 

The encounter March 21, 2009

I was what they call a seeker of truth since my early teens. I was keen on intellectual knowledge and thirsty for understanding myself and the world. At 12 I loved to discuss geopolitical issues, historical findings and scientific discoveries. At 16, while my classmates were getting drunk and having sex with each other, I was in love with philosophy and psychology and a magazine ” Questions of Philosophy” was my table book along with fashion magazines (yes, my quest for beauty was also there!). At 20 I was already so full off all possible knowledge that I reached to the point of desperately wanting soemthing REAL, some knowledge that is practical, that would enable me to implement all I learned, some knowledge that would stimulate my spiritual ascent and not only my intellectual development. At that time I finally realised that my seeking was of a spiritual nature, for I was stuffed by mental knowledge to a great extend. And I realised that I need someone who will guide me on this way.

How I found to Sahaja Yoga and what happened to me I described in an earlier post here. Today I want to share with you some  thoughts on my encounter with the Sahaja Yoga’s founder, Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi and that for a good reason (read in the end of this post).

I could have posted some information from Sahaja Yoga site telling who Shri Mataji is, her background and her contributions. But I will not do that. I personally can tell about the greatness of a personly only by the imact of this person on my life. I preffer the knowledge born in the depth of my heart, which is personal experience based (my long-term readers know that!).

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When I met Shri Mataji at 1996 what really stroke me was her incredible humility. “She has NO EGO!!” – that was my first thought because it appeared to me totally incredible.As someone who was far away from being humble, I was very sensitive on ego-issues. That was quite an experience! Since then I never met anyone about whom I would say so. Even small children – I can clearly see their ego play.

Time passed and as I took to Sahaja Yoga which appeared to be exactly what I was searching for: simple and profound, clear and very practical in every sense of it (reasons given here). Shri Mataji’s personality and teachings had made a great impact on my personal life and spiritual developments. What I value the most in this encounter is: (more…)

 

The Legend of the Jewel October 7, 2008

 

 image by axinia

Once upon a time in a long forgotten land people lived happily and in complete harmony with nature. They owned a divine jewel which connected them with their inner light: The Water of Life!

Centuries full of peace passed but eventually people started to forget about the jewel and soon after they turned to greed and lazyness.

The Gods watched this with anger because they once offered this jewel to mankind and so, they decided to take the jewel away from man and to hide it in safe place. (But where? )The deepest ocean, the highest mountain and even the moon did not seem save enough to get the jewel out of reach from the greed of man.  

Then the Gods agreed to put it in the one place where the curious humans would hardly ever look for it: (more…)

 

C.G.Jung and the Collective Unconsciousness September 18, 2008

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), a Swiss psychiatrist is one of my favourite personalities from the 20th century, and that for many good reasons. It is very refreshing and special, if a person is able to break the limits of his/her cultural mindset and, combining the knowledge of the East and the West, create a new understanding of human development. First, some facts about C.G.Jung and then his most precious discovery  – Collective Unconsciousness…

– Jung started on Latin when he was six years old, beginning a long interest in language and literature — especially ancient literature. Besides most modern western European languages, Jung could read several ancient ones, including Sanskrit, the language of the original Hindu holy books.

-Long an admirer of Sigmund Freud, he met him in Vienna in 1907. The story goes that after they met, Freud canceled all his appointments for the day, and they talked for 13 hours straight, such was the impact of the meeting. Freud eventually came to see Jung as the crown prince of psychoanalysis and his heir apparent. But luckily Jung had never been entirely sold on Freud’s theory.

-In 1921 he published Psychological Types a major work dealing with the relationship between the conscious and unconscious and proposing the recognition of the personality types extrovert and introvert. So we have ot thank him for this very practical take to a definition of a character!

-Jung’s work on himself and his patients convinced him that life has a spiritual purpose beyond material goals. Our main task, he believed, is to discover and fulfill our deep innate potential, much as the acorn contains the potential to become the oak, or the caterpillar to become the butterfly. Based on his study of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Gnosticism, Taoism, and other traditions, Jung perceived that this journey of transformation is at the mystical heart of all religions. It is a journey to meet the self and at the same time to meet the Divine. Unlike Sigmund Freud, Jung thought spiritual experience was essential to our well-being.

-Jung’s theory divides the psyche into three parts. The first is the ego, which Jung identifies with the conscious mind. Closely related is the personal unconscious, which includes anything which is not presently conscious, but can be.  But it does not include the instincts that Freud would have it include.

Then Jung adds the part of the psyche that makes his theory stand out from all others: the collective unconscious. We could call it your “psychic inheritance.” It is the reservoir of our experiences as a species, a kind of knowledge we are all born with. (more…)

 

 
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