1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

The Divine Feminine in Islam June 16, 2012

Filed under: thoughts — axinia @ 11:06 pm
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BURAQ

The fanaticism that we see in modern Islam is a new development in a religion that, in its early history, was famous for its tolerance and respect for other religions. In Islam’s classical period in medieval Spain and Egypt perhaps only Buddhism rivalled Islam’s tolerance. The fundamentalism that characterises the behaviour of many of today’s Muslims is in fact anti-Koranic.

While the Muslim vision is often perceived to be authoritarian and punitive the Koran, on close inspection, is filled with descriptions and vision of God’s more feminine attributes such as gentleness, providence, love, universal compassion and tender-heartedness.

The religious intolerance that characterises the behaviour of many Muslim communities today is inconsistent with the heritage of tolerance that is professed by the Islamic tradition. For example, the Koran clearly states in several passages that any person who lives a life of holy reverence is welcomed into paradise regardless of their religion. Muhammad openly praises both Judaism (Abraham is deeply respected within the Koran) and Christianity (Muhammad frequently praises Jesus and Mary in the Koran).

Even more surprising is the Koran’s reverence for Mary, mother of Christ. Muhammad (and also in later Islamic theological scriptures) regarded Mary as the most marvellous of all women, a high adept and living example of the pure and holy life. Later Koranic commentaries describe Mary as an intervening force between God (Allah) and humanity. This intervening force is characterised by Allah’s mercy, forgiveness, sweetness and humility- the embodiment of Allah’s love for creation.

In one of the most powerful Hadiths ( prophetic sayings of Muhammad) it is reported that Muhammad said, “Paradise is at the feet of the Mother”. Does this suggest that the feminine aspect of God is an important and essential pathway to the attainment of supreme consciousness?

Muhammad’s peak defining experience, called the Meraj, saw him elevated through the seven heavens to the realm of God Almighty at the resplendant Sidrath where he communed with God, received his divine visions and instructions and was placed on the inexorable course of his life-mission to establish Islam. Muhammad was escorted by the archangel Gabriel (a masculine force) but the vehicle upon which Muhammad rode was the beautiful “Buraq”. The Buraq was a white horse with wings and the face of a woman! Clearly suggesting that the great power by which Muhammad was elevated to the level of supreme consciousness was ultimately feminine in nature! Some scholars say that the Buraq is an Islamic symbol of the Kundalini, a force that Eastern Yogis describe as the Goddess or Divine Mother. (more…)

 

The ultimate happening May 8, 2010

It is interesting to note that each religion gives a different name to this event. The Koran calls it Resurrection and the reward takes the form of “gardens watered by running streams“. The goal of Hinduism is “self-realisation” and that of Buddhism “nirvana”, where the being feels a rain of bliss upon him. Christians call it “baptism” or “entry into the kingdom of God”. There too, the symbolic gesture of John the Baptist uses the element of water on Christ’s fontanel. In the same way the Pentecostal wind which descended upon the heads of the disciples marked their entry into a new dimension, the enlightenment of their awareness through the perception of vibrations, an experience which is in every way similar to the awakening of the Kundalini today.

Are not streams, rain and wind the metaphors used by the different traditions to refer to the event of self-realization? Hindus, Jews, Christians and Muslims experience their union in the light of the same source, that of Allah.

The Hindu has no choice but to acknowledge the cool showers of bliss descending on his brain devoid of thoughts, drenched in the absolute silence of the Eternal. The Jew enjoyed the same well-being  and feels the burning bush which was revealed to Moses vibrating within him: (more…)

 

I am Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and atheist – all at once April 15, 2010

We are becoming “multi-religious”, at least what has been observed in Europe. Disappointed in Christianity, people try to create their “own” religion, a mix of all existing religions. For instance, about 30 percent of the Austrians may be classified as “religious composers”: They put together their world-view of various elements such as Christian positions, humanistic, naturalistic, and Far Eastern thought. This is how “Kathpress” reports out in the new long-term study of religion in the lives of Austrians 1970-2000 “. Interesting, isn’t it?

The idea of mixing religions is not unusual to me, the more so I see it absolutely natural, since I could never understand how one can accept only one religion, because they all have such beautiful and deep messages!.. However I am fascinated by the fact how rapidly the society is also growing in its world understanding and  ultimately – in spiritual development.

As for me, being a realised person, I not only know that all religions are one and the same, but I actually feel it and “use” all of them in my daily life. Let me give you several simple examples (of cause it is all more complex and inter-connected, but it would take pages and pages to explain):

– If I happened to have a headache, I say the Christ Lord’ s prayer (“Our Father..”) and the headache is gone.

– If I address Ganesha (Hindu Deity with an elephant head and child’s body), I can easily manage children, and even all the adults around me start acting more innocently, it seems like a child gets awakened within them (since Ganesha is very powerful archetype of childhood and innocence). (more…)

 

Religulous (religion+rediculous) – a film review April 9, 2009

 

Having an atheistic background I was naturally attracted by this poster – to see it in the middle of still catholic Vienna was a bit of a surprise. The poster was inspiring enough to visit cinema (which is a rare thing for me!).

Did I like it? Let me give you the detalis first and then I will deliver my opinion.

What is the film about?
The documentary RELIGULOUS is a film about organized religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Mormonism, TV evangelism and even Scientology, with detours into pagan cults and ancient Egypt. Bill Maher, host, writer and debater, believes they are all crazy. He doesn’t get around to Hinduism or Buddhism, but he probably doesn’t approve of them, either. He wants to convince his audience that religion is not only ridiculous, it’s downright dangerous.

How does Maher do that?
Typically anyone trying to make a case against God goes right to the pedophile priests and the suicide bombers, but Maher makes it a point to focus on normal, reasonably sane religious people. He talks to truckers in a roadside chapel, he chats with random, middle-class tourists at a Christian-themed amusement park. He talks to religious shop owners, small town preachers, televanglists, Jews for Jesus, fundamentalist U.S. Senators, Vatican priests, religious scientists, secular Muslims, gay Muslims, people in America (Utah), Europe, and even in Jerusalem. Though those fumbling for an excuse to discredit him may claim otherwise, these aren’t extremists or lunatics. These are for the most part sane, rational, even intelligent people who believe something which Maher believes is insane.
To the film’s credit, Maher never engages in Michael Moore-style gotcha tactics, but rather asks questions that raise more questions, in the form of a Socratic dialogue.
Smart, hilarious and thoroughly entertaining. Although rather a hard-core at some points.

Highlights?
All in all, the film is often funny, frequently unfair, mostly simplistic, at times offensively unethical and ultimately limited. I found stunning Maher’s visit of the Holy Land Experience in Florida, a theme park where you can watch Christ being nailed up three times a day(!) – a kind of a Christian Disneyland. (more…)

 

East and West September 10, 2008

 

In the West, Intellect is the source of life.

In the East, Love is the basis of life.

Through Love, Intellect grows acquainted with Reality,

And Intellect gives stability to the work of Love,

Arise and lay the foundations of a new world,

By wedding Intellect to Love.

Allama Iqbal (1877-1938)

 

 

 

Cool Vibrations April 12, 2008

  photo by axinia

Everyone who has felt cool vibrations reports the same feelings: a pleasant cool wind blowing in one`s hands, on top of one`s head or sometimes around the body. Millions of people who have got their self-realisation can prove that, even if they do not practice Sahaja Yoga. Although self-realisation is being given a-mass since the last 37 years, there is not much information about cool vibrations on Internet. Here is my small contribution to this very special topic.

What fascinates me the most about the whole thing is that:

1. Cool vibrations are the material manifestation of spirituality to me (material because it can be not only felt but also measured with the modern medical technology)

2. I can not influence feeling cool vibrations!  – vibrations can be also hot, or warm, or less pleasant. Whatever I percept, i cannot influence it with my will or mental power. I cannot command it! Either it is cool or not. Truly amazing!

3.That cool vibrations seem to lead their own live or to be a kind of a living being: suddenly in the middle of a talk/film/writing/meditation they would blow powerfully all around and then just calm down to a little breeze or even warmth.

In many scriptures this experience is reported as being accompanied by a wind, or coolness, for example  (more…)

 

 
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