1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

What’s in the silence? April 21, 2012

Silence is a genuine spiritual phenomenon experienced and described in all traditions. Here is a wonderful collection of quotes by different masters on SILENCE.

“Be quiet in your mind, quiet in your senses, and also quiet in your body. Then, when all these are quiet, don’t do anything. In that state truth will reveal itself to you. It will appear in front of you and ask,” what do you want?”

Kabir

 

“Empty yourself of everything. Let the mind rest at peace. The ten thousand things rise and fall while the Self watches their return. They grow and flourish and then return to the source. Returning to the source is stillness, which is the way of nature.”

Lao Tzu

 

“In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness.”

Ghandi

 

“Be still, and know that I am (God).”

Psalm 46:10 (more…)

 

I am Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and atheist – all at once April 15, 2010

We are becoming “multi-religious”, at least what has been observed in Europe. Disappointed in Christianity, people try to create their “own” religion, a mix of all existing religions. For instance, about 30 percent of the Austrians may be classified as “religious composers”: They put together their world-view of various elements such as Christian positions, humanistic, naturalistic, and Far Eastern thought. This is how “Kathpress” reports out in the new long-term study of religion in the lives of Austrians 1970-2000 “. Interesting, isn’t it?

The idea of mixing religions is not unusual to me, the more so I see it absolutely natural, since I could never understand how one can accept only one religion, because they all have such beautiful and deep messages!.. However I am fascinated by the fact how rapidly the society is also growing in its world understanding and  ultimately – in spiritual development.

As for me, being a realised person, I not only know that all religions are one and the same, but I actually feel it and “use” all of them in my daily life. Let me give you several simple examples (of cause it is all more complex and inter-connected, but it would take pages and pages to explain):

– If I happened to have a headache, I say the Christ Lord’ s prayer (“Our Father..”) and the headache is gone.

– If I address Ganesha (Hindu Deity with an elephant head and child’s body), I can easily manage children, and even all the adults around me start acting more innocently, it seems like a child gets awakened within them (since Ganesha is very powerful archetype of childhood and innocence). (more…)

 

The magnetic mount January 21, 2009

I have been there. I have been enchanted by this magestic mount. And I could have meditated on it forever…

This very special for me mountain may not look so special at the first sight. Although its peak is quite artistic, one can find many similar hills in some regions of Maharashtra, India – by the way, it makes me think that Indian architecture is just the mirror of its nature…

This mount belongs to Saptashringi Hills (near Nasik, Maharashtra) famous for the great sage Markandeya who used to live there in ancient times. As a beautiful outcome of his enlightenment and mediations we have got Markandeya Purana, one of the Puranas or secondary Hindu scriptures.

I can honestly say that this mount (or hill?) fascinates me even more than the powerful Devi Swayambhu (self-manifested divinity, mostly as a stone), which is on the opposite hill. The story tells that (more…)

 

Do you believe in Rebirth? September 27, 2008

 author unknown

I got this smart picture sent from India – that is an excellent piece of humour 🙂 I enjoyed the picture so much that I felt inspired to write a post on this truly mysterious topic.

Reincarnation, literally “to be made flesh again”, is a metaphysical belief that some essential part of a living being (in some variations only human beings) survives death to be reborn in a new body. This essential part is often referred to as the spirit or soul, the “higher” or “true” self, “divine spark”, or “I”. According to such beliefs, a new personality is developed during each life in the physical world, but some part of the self remains constant throughout the successive lives.

Belief in reincarnation is an ancient phenomenon. This doctrine is a central tenet within the majority of Indian religious traditions, such as Hinduism (including Yoga, Vaishnavism, and Shaivism), Jainism, and Sikhism. The idea was also entertained by some ancient Greek philosophers. Many modern Pagans also believe in reincarnation as do some New Age movements, along with followers of Spiritism, practitioners of certain African traditions, and students of esoteric philosophies such as Kabbalah, Sufism and Gnostic and Esoteric Christianity. The Buddhist concept of Rebirth although often referred to as reincarnation differs significantly from the Hindu-based traditions and New Age movements in that there is no “self” (or eternal soul) to reincarnate.

Rebirth or reincarnation has become a popular topic since last decades in the West. (more…)

 

C.G.Jung and the Collective Unconsciousness September 18, 2008

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), a Swiss psychiatrist is one of my favourite personalities from the 20th century, and that for many good reasons. It is very refreshing and special, if a person is able to break the limits of his/her cultural mindset and, combining the knowledge of the East and the West, create a new understanding of human development. First, some facts about C.G.Jung and then his most precious discovery  – Collective Unconsciousness…

– Jung started on Latin when he was six years old, beginning a long interest in language and literature — especially ancient literature. Besides most modern western European languages, Jung could read several ancient ones, including Sanskrit, the language of the original Hindu holy books.

-Long an admirer of Sigmund Freud, he met him in Vienna in 1907. The story goes that after they met, Freud canceled all his appointments for the day, and they talked for 13 hours straight, such was the impact of the meeting. Freud eventually came to see Jung as the crown prince of psychoanalysis and his heir apparent. But luckily Jung had never been entirely sold on Freud’s theory.

-In 1921 he published Psychological Types a major work dealing with the relationship between the conscious and unconscious and proposing the recognition of the personality types extrovert and introvert. So we have ot thank him for this very practical take to a definition of a character!

-Jung’s work on himself and his patients convinced him that life has a spiritual purpose beyond material goals. Our main task, he believed, is to discover and fulfill our deep innate potential, much as the acorn contains the potential to become the oak, or the caterpillar to become the butterfly. Based on his study of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Gnosticism, Taoism, and other traditions, Jung perceived that this journey of transformation is at the mystical heart of all religions. It is a journey to meet the self and at the same time to meet the Divine. Unlike Sigmund Freud, Jung thought spiritual experience was essential to our well-being.

-Jung’s theory divides the psyche into three parts. The first is the ego, which Jung identifies with the conscious mind. Closely related is the personal unconscious, which includes anything which is not presently conscious, but can be.  But it does not include the instincts that Freud would have it include.

Then Jung adds the part of the psyche that makes his theory stand out from all others: the collective unconscious. We could call it your “psychic inheritance.” It is the reservoir of our experiences as a species, a kind of knowledge we are all born with. (more…)

 

In all traditions, Spirit means breath or wind July 26, 2008

image by axinia

image by axinia

In all traditions, Spirit means breath or wind:

Our word Spirit is derived from the Latin Spiritus, which means breath. For the Greeks, the Spirit is known as Pneuma, a term which also means breath. The Hebrew word Ruah is synonymous with wind. Yahweh is derived from the root HWY, which also means wind.

The consistency in these different terms in not fortuitous. It results from the intuition of the Unconscious, which makes clear that to know the Spirit is to know the breath of God. This reminds on of the passages in the New Testament which describes the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost:

“Suddenly a sound came form heaven

Like the rush of a mighty wind

And it filled the house where we were sitting”

In India, this breath is known as Brahmachaitanya, the Breath of God. In the tradition of the Vedanta, the Prasana Upanishad(commented by Shankaracharia) declares: “in the heart resides the Atman, the Self. It is the centre of a hundred and one little channels….In these moves…the breath”.

Still in India, (more…)

 

Why Hinduism is not becoming popular in the West? May 14, 2008

 image by axinia

The British colonizers discredited Hinduism as being merely backward superstitions, and even today, whereas Buddhism is very much in fashion with American and European intellectuals, Hinduism is largely ignored.

Given that all the essential premises of Buddhism are already contained in Hinduism, including how and why it is helpful to be able to control the senses, it is a shame that so few Westerners are interested in what it has to say… (more…)

 

 
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