1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

C.G.Jung: I know God September 24, 2009

Some of my readers may remember my popular post “I do not belive in God”. In that post I claim that I have never believed in God, and even now, being a spiritual person I cannot say I  belive in God. I`d rather say, I know God. It is not the matter of believing, but of knowing.

There was one comment out of 57th left on thas post saying that actually Carl Gustav Jung also said the same thing. Now by chance I have found a video of him saying exactly that!

 

Powerful, isn’t it?

C.G: Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist, an influential thinker and the founder of analytical psychology known as Jungian psychology. Jung’s approach to psychology has been influential in the field of depth psychology and in countercultural movements across the globe. (more…)

 

Personality tests April 28, 2009

 (image by me)

My two favorite personality tests are Mayers-Briggs -Typindicator and Multiple Intelligence Test. Based on my expeirence, these two are able to give a realtively clear and information-rich personality snap, especially what the social life /work is concerned.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator(MBTI) assessment is a psychometric questionnaire designed to measure psychological preferences in how people perceive the world and make decisions. These preferences were extrapolated from the typological theories originated by Carl Gustav Jung, as published in his 1921 book Psychological Types (1923). The original developers of the personality inventory were Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers. They began creating the indicator during World War II, believing that a knowledge of personality preferences would help women who were entering the industrial workforce for the first time identify the sort of war-time jobs where they would be “most comfortable and effective”. The initial questionnaire grew into the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which was first published in 1962. The MBTI focuses on normal populations and emphasizes the value of naturally occurring differences.

I first heard of this test from the INSEAD  Business School Professor who told me that the test is being widely used in the USA especially in work-related matters. Interstingly, I have found some evidence that despite being one of the favorite test in American business schools, the test has been mistrusted by scholars. Skeptics criticize the terminology of the MBTI as being so “vague and general” as to allow any kind of behavior to fit any personality type. They claim that this results in the Forer effect, where individuals give a high rating to a positive description that supposedly applies specifically to them. On the other hand, some theorists, such as David Keirsey, have expanded on the MBTI descriptions, providing even greater detail. For instance, Keirsey’s descriptions of his four temperaments, which he derived from the sixteen MBTI personality types, show how the temperaments differ in terms of language use, intellectual orientation, educational and vocational interests, social orientation, self image, personal values, social roles, and characteristic hand gestures.

Whatever it is, I was using this test at my work for the staff assessment and found it very helpful. For those who know me in person or for a longer time throught my blogging: you can see about the correctness of this test by my results below or by testing your personality here. NOTE: I did some similar tests and got the same result everywhere! (more…)

 

C.G.Jung and the Collective Unconsciousness September 18, 2008

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), a Swiss psychiatrist is one of my favourite personalities from the 20th century, and that for many good reasons. It is very refreshing and special, if a person is able to break the limits of his/her cultural mindset and, combining the knowledge of the East and the West, create a new understanding of human development. First, some facts about C.G.Jung and then his most precious discovery  – Collective Unconsciousness…

– Jung started on Latin when he was six years old, beginning a long interest in language and literature — especially ancient literature. Besides most modern western European languages, Jung could read several ancient ones, including Sanskrit, the language of the original Hindu holy books.

-Long an admirer of Sigmund Freud, he met him in Vienna in 1907. The story goes that after they met, Freud canceled all his appointments for the day, and they talked for 13 hours straight, such was the impact of the meeting. Freud eventually came to see Jung as the crown prince of psychoanalysis and his heir apparent. But luckily Jung had never been entirely sold on Freud’s theory.

-In 1921 he published Psychological Types a major work dealing with the relationship between the conscious and unconscious and proposing the recognition of the personality types extrovert and introvert. So we have ot thank him for this very practical take to a definition of a character!

-Jung’s work on himself and his patients convinced him that life has a spiritual purpose beyond material goals. Our main task, he believed, is to discover and fulfill our deep innate potential, much as the acorn contains the potential to become the oak, or the caterpillar to become the butterfly. Based on his study of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Gnosticism, Taoism, and other traditions, Jung perceived that this journey of transformation is at the mystical heart of all religions. It is a journey to meet the self and at the same time to meet the Divine. Unlike Sigmund Freud, Jung thought spiritual experience was essential to our well-being.

-Jung’s theory divides the psyche into three parts. The first is the ego, which Jung identifies with the conscious mind. Closely related is the personal unconscious, which includes anything which is not presently conscious, but can be.  But it does not include the instincts that Freud would have it include.

Then Jung adds the part of the psyche that makes his theory stand out from all others: the collective unconscious. We could call it your “psychic inheritance.” It is the reservoir of our experiences as a species, a kind of knowledge we are all born with. (more…)

 

 
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