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the only truth I know is my own experience

The ultimate happening May 8, 2010

It is interesting to note that each religion gives a different name to this event. The Koran calls it Resurrection and the reward takes the form of “gardens watered by running streams“. The goal of Hinduism is “self-realisation” and that of Buddhism “nirvana”, where the being feels a rain of bliss upon him. Christians call it “baptism” or “entry into the kingdom of God”. There too, the symbolic gesture of John the Baptist uses the element of water on Christ’s fontanel. In the same way the Pentecostal wind which descended upon the heads of the disciples marked their entry into a new dimension, the enlightenment of their awareness through the perception of vibrations, an experience which is in every way similar to the awakening of the Kundalini today.

Are not streams, rain and wind the metaphors used by the different traditions to refer to the event of self-realization? Hindus, Jews, Christians and Muslims experience their union in the light of the same source, that of Allah.

The Hindu has no choice but to acknowledge the cool showers of bliss descending on his brain devoid of thoughts, drenched in the absolute silence of the Eternal. The Jew enjoyed the same well-being  and feels the burning bush which was revealed to Moses vibrating within him: (more…)

 

How S.Freud made his theory to the religion of the 20th Century October 2, 2008

This is the continuation of the post “Freudian Theory and Its Crime Against Motherhood”.

“After all, much of his theory is derived from his attempt to psychoanalyse himself and cure his own neurosis. Freud himself, so it has been said, is the only man who have been able to impress his own neurosis on the world and remould humanity in this own image”  – says H.J. Eysenck in his brilliant book “Decline and Fall of the Freudian Empire.”

In this book Eysenck’s critique is truly devastating for a modern reader to encounter, and one can only wonder why Freud’s ideas have had such an impact on the popular imagination. Eysenck’s lucidly expressed explanation is that the answer lies in the ancient human desire to get something for nothing. Freudian methods can obtain theories without having to laboriously obtain reliable facts. Non-scientific thinkers, including literary authors, new agers, pseudo-psychologists, social workers and pedagogues, whose hunger for explanations exceeds their common sense, mistake idle speculation for “insight,” and lamentably fall all too easily for humbug.

So who was this genious who managed to create a new religion of the 20th century?

Freud was far from an integrated person, and he was never the apostle of the scientific ideas which his biographers have tried to depict. The was an unbalanced neurotic, who took cocaine for much of his life. He falsified facts in order to have his theory accepted. He was dictatorial. He hated women. He admitted that his incestuous desires for his mother, from his earlier years, had led him to imagine the Oedipus complex.

It is not only that his sexual theory is breathtakingly absurd, but also his other theories like as free association and interpretation of dreams which are basic to psychotherapy were not his discoveries! More significantly, it is claimed that he was the originator of the concept of Unconscioussness  – which is far from the truth. (more…)

 

The purpose of the Japanese Gardens July 12, 2008

 image by snutur

In Japan we had a great master whose name was Vidhitama. He was the disciple of Lord Buddah and he went to Japan and started the Zen system. Zen means meditation-dhyana – and he wanted people to become “thoughtlessly aware”. He found out many ways of making people “thoughtlessly aware” – the tea ceremony and the temples that they have, are all meant to create thoughtless awareness.

I was amazed that none of the Japanese knew what the purpose of these gardens were. There is one garden which has some moss on top of a hill in a very small area and it is very interesting. You have to see the flowers and other foliage there through a magnifying glass. And this should amaze a person and one should become thoughtlessly aware.

Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi, META MODERN ERA

 

Take off the shoes of your brain! March 29, 2007

 

   We walk in our shoes, rarely touching the earth with our naked feet.

Yet sometimes we have the urge to take our shoes off and feel, with delight,

the dew on the grass refreshing our toes or the fullness of the sand on the beach warming our feet.     

 

Would it not be nice if we could do the same with our brain,

take off it`s shoes,

that is, it`s  projections and concepts,

and just see, just know.

 

 

Gregoire de Klabermatten, “The third Advent”

(image by bokehren)

 

 
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