1000 petals by axinia

the only truth I know is my own experience

What do you know about Goethe’s Theory of Colours? March 12, 2009

We all know Johann Wolfgang von Goethe  (1749-1832) as the greatest of Germany’s poets (comparable to Shakespeare and Dante). But he was not only that! Goethe was also an avid amateur scientist and displayed through his careful observations and his keen, what might now be called phenomenological, mind an ability to discern the depth of the phenomenon in question. As we all learned Newton’s theory of colour formation. at school, it was very interesting for me  to discover that there was a contradiction to it, a contradiction made by a poet!

Goethe, being fascinated by the colours generated from the prism conducted his own investigations and found to his great surprise that Newton’s colour theory was, if not incorrect, but rather mechanical in nature and based on an “interpretation” of the phenomenon rather than the truth as it stands.

 Goethe’s Colour Wheel

 His 1,400-page treatise on color  Theory of Colours ( Zur Farbenlehre) was published in 1810. The work comprises three sections: i) a didactic section in which Goethe presents his own observations, ii) a polemic section in which he makes his case against Newton, and iii) a historical section. It contains some of the earliest and most accurate descriptions of phenomena such as coloured shadows, refraction, and chromatic aberration.

Goethe reformulates the topic of color in an entirely new way. Newton had viewed color as a physical problem, involving light striking objects and entering our eyes. Goethe realizes that the sensations of color reaching our brain are also shaped by our perception — by the mechanics of human vision and by the way our brains process information. Therefore, according to Goethe, what we see of an object depends upon the object, the lighting and our perception.

 In fact, Goethe’s theory is being widely used today but only few of us are aware of his discovery (reminds me of a story with Nicola Tesla).

What I personally liked about this theory is the Goethes’s explanation of the pastel colours: (more…)

 

The answer March 9, 2009

(image by me)

To see a World in a Grain of Sand,

And heaven in a Wild flower,

Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand

And Eternity in an hour.

poem by William Blake

 

Love and Harmony February 17, 2009

Filed under: innocence,joy,love,poem,poetry,spirituality,thoughts — axinia @ 10:48 pm
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Love and harmony combine,
And round our souls entwine
While thy branches mix with mine,
And our roots together join.

Joys upon our branches sit,
Chirping loud and singing sweet;
Like gentle streams beneath our feet
Innocence and virtue meet.

Thou the golden fruit dost bear,
I am clad in flowers fair;
Thy sweet boughs perfume the air,
And the turtle buildeth there.

There she sits and feeds her young,
Sweet I hear her mournful song;
And thy lovely leaves among,
There is love, I hear his tongue.

There his charming nest doth lay,
There he sleeps the night away;
There he sports along the day,
And doth among our branches play.

William Blake
(1757 – 1827)

 

 

A human being consists of the whole world January 27, 2009

A human body consists of all five elements

And resembles of different animals.

A human heart can be a desert or a flourishing garden,

A stone or a fresh cooling waters.

A human brain can be a rich soil or a fruit tree

a lightning or a fast flowing river,

Male and Female essences are reflecting the Sun and the Moon,

The Breath of God is in every cell.

…Truly, what a perfectly beautiful creature, a human being.

A being that consists of the whole world!..

 

by axinia

 

The musk is in the deer, but it seeks it not within itself: it wanders in quest of grass. January 20, 2009

One of the most beautiful poems about seeking the truth and actually finding it by Kabir (translated by Rabindranath Tagore):

The moon shines in my body, but my blind eyes cannot see it:
The moon is within me, and so is the sun.
The unstruck drum of Eternity is sounded within me; but my deaf  ears cannot hear it. 

So long as man clamours for the “I” and the “Mine”,  his works are as naught:
When all love of the “I” and the “Mine” is dead, then the work of the Lord is done.

 

For work has no other aim than the getting of knowledge:
When that comes, then work is put away. 

The flower blooms for the fruit: when the fruit comes, the flower withers.
The musk is in the deer, but it seeks it not within itself: it wanders in quest of grass.

 

With mind immersed in Love January 3, 2009

This beautiful poem by Kabir seem to be the best answer I can give  to the discussion in the previous post “No man can teach another man“…

With mind immersed in Love, why should I talk?
Having the diamond knotted safe, why again I open the knot?
Empty scales at initiation are full, why measure again?
Rationality became intoxicated, by drinking without measures
Swan reaching the lake, need wander in ponds and puddles?
Your Lord is your inner Self, why seek him outwardly
Says Kabir listen my folks, I realized the Lord within
– like oil contained in the seed.

 

The picture is a good illustration to the idea, because it shows the enlightenment and the bliss one can really get in a powerful sahaj (after self-realisation) meditation.

 I don`t know the origin of that amazing painting, but apparently it is depicting Mother Mary. (more…)

 

What it feels like to be the spirit December 12, 2008

image by axinia

Following the recent discussion on this blog in the difference between spirit and soul, I want to quote a great enlightened soul, Indian poet Kabir (1398-1448) that described this absolutely exceptional spiritual state so well:

Neither am I righteous nor non-righteous
Neither am I an ascetic nor a sensualist
Neither do I speak nor do I listen
Neither am I a servant nor a master
Neither am I constrained nor Liberated
Neither am I sad nor jubilant
Neither am I distinctly isolated from anything
Nor am I Identified completely with anything
Neither do I go to the world of hell
Nor do I proceed to the world of heaven
All actions are really my actions
But yet I am distinct from the actions
This truth only a rare exceptional one realizes
Such a person sits in quiescence

Oh Kabîr don’t bring forth any creation
And don’t efface anything either

 

poem by Kabir (poet-saint of India, 15th Century)

 

You foollish mind October 29, 2008

                           

Oh! You foolish mind, why can’t you see the obvious,

that everyting that you think is yours

does not belong to you.

The pure knowledge, the brains to grasp it,

the talents, the beauty, whatever that’s truly precious,

comes from one ultimate source,

and there it has got to return,

set free by the free will,

the only thing that we can dare to call our own.

 

poem by Armaity H. Bhabha “Sahajmala”

 

Pushkin is Mozart October 21, 2008

 …in my perception 🙂

Seriously, when I listen to Mozart, I get the same state and same type of vibrations like when I read or recite Pushkin. Absolutely the same!

 Mozart         Pushkin

You surely know Mozart, that most popular musician ever. But who is Pushkin and why can I feel it this way?

Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin was Russian 19th century country’s greatest poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. Pushkin (1799-1837) blended Old Slavonic with vernacular Russian into a rich, melodic language. In fact, he created the language Russians speak today and defined the literary baseline for all great Russian writers, among them Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.   (more…)

 

Pure Love October 1, 2008

 

Pure Love does not cry,

Pure Love does not ask,

Pure love does.

 

Pure Love gives no worries,

Pure Love gives no thoughts,

Pure Love gives.

 

Pure Love is not a myth,

Pure Love is not a gist,

Pure Love is.

 

image and poem by axinia

 

 
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